Associazione ISAA
ForumAstronautico
AstronautiNEWS
AstronautiCAST
AstronautiCON
StratoSpera
ForumAstronautico.it

Buoni argomenti "contro" lo shuttle.

0 Utenti e 1 Visitatore stanno visualizzando questo topic.

Buoni argomenti "contro" lo shuttle.
« il: Mar 21/02/2006, 16:35 »
Sto seguendo un interessante Thread su http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/category-view.asp                               tra i sostenitori dello space shuttle e quelli del CEV. A parte il solito "bla,bla" se sia più "cool" una capsula o un veicolo alato,ho trovato particolarmente interessanti alcuni  argomenti pro capsula .Riassumendo in sintesi:1-I voli spaziali presentano un indiscutibile ed ineliminabile margine di rischio,un architettura basata su un sistema complicato come quello dello Shuttle presenta molti più rischi di uno più semplice basato su una capsula stile Apollo.2-Gran parte dei compiti per i quali lo Shuttle è stato costruito si sono rivelati nel tempo troppo pericolosi o antieconomici.Oggi ci troviamo con un sistema disegnato per fare cose che non sono più richieste.4-Lo shuttle è una macchina brucia soldi perchè dopo ogni missione  deve praticamente essere quasi ricostruito.L'orbiter è un veicolo complicatissimo; propio in ragione della sua riusabilità gran parte del bilancio va via per la manutenzione post volo . Una capsula presenta il vantaggio di un modulo di servizio "semplice" ed economico  perchè a perdere.5-costruire dei satelliti pensati per una durata relativamente limitata e  lanciarli con piccoli vettori è infinitamente più economico che inviarli nello spazio con  missioni dello Shuttle,per poi farli  riparare o recuperare dall'orbiter .6-Un astronave costruita per essere riutilizzata più è più volte è un sistema "rigido"incapace di evolvere nel design e nei sistemi di bordo.Il modulo di comando,o il modulo  lunare dell' Apollo presentava di missione in missione sensibili migliorie tecnologiche,evolvendo di continuo. Inserisco alcuni degli interventi originali più interessanti.

Citazione
Space travel is not about what looks cool or what attracts the public, its about the very dangerous job of taking people into a truly horrific environment and trying desperately not to kill them while doing it.

I absolutely guarantee that there will be a loss of life on whatever vehicle we build to replace Shuttle - no matter what its design.

It's not a question of IF, but WHEN.

All we can do is make sure we do everything possible to ensure that loss happens as far away in time as we possibly can.

The biggest lesson Challenger and now Columbia can possibly teach us is that space flight isn't safe, and we should try everything to make sure it is as safe as possible. Shuttle has taught us that a very complicated system is far more dangerous than a very simple one.

And this is a lesson many of the real creators behind the VSE realised up-close and personal. Astronauts such as Owen Garriott were the real architects behind this Vision. Scott Horowitz, formerly of ATK, now back at NASA is another brain behind this philosophy - and there's no coincidence that ATK were the ones who came up with the catch-phrase "Safe, Simple, Soon" running through the core of the VSE.

These guys want the safest possible system to fly in because they are ones who have quite litterally risked their own butts doing it, and they are the ones who's close workmates died on those orbiters. They are the ones who also had to comfort the grieving families of those lost. They aren't blinded by what looks cool - they know better than anyone else what really needs to be done.

Just because Shuttle looks fancy, doesn't mean its good. Just because Klipper or OSP look cool, does not mean they are safe. They are all more complicated than a simple capsule, and thus there is more chance of something going wrong.

We've all become brainwashed by the last 40 years of spacecraft on Sci-Fi shows, but the safest tool for this job is the simplest one. With no over-complications, an Apollo-style capsule should be far safer than most other concepts.

And so the problem of what spacecraft design is truly the best was very carefully analysed. Go and read the ESAS report and you can see very quickly that an enormous amount of real analysis found that the Apollo capsule shape was an amazingly good design, probably even more ideal than people realised. Griffin is on record as having said how surprised the analysts were to find just how right the Apollo guys got it.

The conical capsule is the most ideal concept for the risky job of carrying crews into space atop a rocket, taking them to some location in space, and then bringing them back safely afterwards.

The TPS is the simpest possible, it requires no overly complex shapes, no risky seams, doesn't need different materials and on a conical shape capsule it will orientate itself automatically to the ideal re-entry profile without any sort of controlled intervention.

The conical shape also weighs the least of virtually any option - which is an incredibly important factor.

And being a cone, it is ideally suited to being placed on top of the simplest possible rocket (the CLV is very simple too, and since the fixes after Challenger, its hardware looks to be very well proven too) with an escape system to get the crew away from any possible disaster.

While it would certainly be realy cool to have spaceships that look like the starship Enterprise, or the Pan-Am clipper from 2001; it just isn't necessary to get the job done. And I just don't think cool looking spaceships are worth a single life.

Ross.
A few comments;

Firstly Shuttle SRBs travel thousands of miles across the continent for reload.

Secondly CEV LZ can be a desert in mid-west but I don't see why it couldn't be on sea a few dozen miles off the coast of KSC. Or Great Lakes. Or Lake Pontchartrain. BTW it's not obligatory to send a costly navy carrier battle group to pick up a capsule from the sea, the SRB recovery ships could do the trick. Shuttle can land only on few runways in the world, miss them and it's guaranteed loss of vehicle. A capsule can land almost anywhere. It might even do an emergency landing smack in the middle of some suburb. It may crunch a doghouse or put a serious dent on someones roof, people in the house have ample time to get into safety/rescue the dog because the parachuting capsule lands relatively slow, and by that time every local radio and tv channel is broadcasting 'watch the sky, spacecraft going to landing here!!'. Once the craft hits the doghouse/roof the residents are happy because it was just a ten ton craft landing vertically at 16mph instead of hundred ton craft plowing horisontally at 200mph.

This gives much more freedom to plan missions, and it's a major safety issue. Imagine a situation where CEV experiences malfunction on orbit and has to immediately do a reentry (crew health issue, micrometeor punctures airtank or something similar). The CEV can do that and has a good chance of succesful landing. It might land far away from nominal LZ, perhaps other side of the globe, but IMO the terrestrial part of the logistical problem of getting crew back from space is peanuts compared to dangers in reentry and landing.

Thirdly, related to above, a lesson from STS: crossrange capability. AFAIK Shuttle has never actually used the very challenging USAF requirement of doing just one polar orbit and land back to launchsite. But it dictated the specification for very high crossrange. The CEV has much inferior crossrange for two reasons; it's not really needed ... and a capsule needs it even less because of the relaxed LZ requirements.

And last is general comment of another lesson from STS: downmass capability. Another thing that is not really needed for the time being. It was supposed to make routine of bringing satellites back to earth for repair/rehaul. That falls apart for at least couple of reasons; you need two flights by complex and costly machine to do it, and most of the satellites that might benefit from such service are out of reach at GEO. In the long run it's more practical and cheaper to just overengineer the satellites, launch them using cheap expendables and operate the sat until it breaks. The only real downmass requirement for a very long time will be people, results from experiments and samples. A capsule design can handle that perfectly well.


Disclaimer: I'm not anti-Orbiter zealot and would love to see something like X-33 fly some day, but IMO the ESAS 'K.I.S.S.' approach suits NASA the best right now, yielding maximum results with the limited resources(aka money) available                                                         The maintenance work required to make those re-usable components on STS fly again tends to be incredibly intensive and very expensive. Maintaining re-usable engines & such things between each mission requires a huge portion of the STS budget. There are hudreds of workers crawling all over each orbiter for weeks between flights, just attempting to prepare it for the next flight.

The SM seems to be being designed to be as simple as possible, and discarded. If it had to be recovered and designed for re-use multiple times, it would have to be significantly more complicated and require a large team of people inspecting, testing, repairing and servicing it each time it flies.

I think they must have concluded that such service work is too costly and it would be noticably cheaper and easier to just make the SM simply for one use and then just discard it at the end of the mission.

Another issue - if you re-use the same thing over and over again, it becomes a lot more difficult to change its design when you want to imporove it. Look at the Orbiters - they only recently all got the glass cockpits which airliners have been enjoying for many years. Evolutionary changes to the design are very slow to happen in a re-usable design. Conversely, in a disposable design, they can make changes on the production line and possibly even fly those improvements on the very next flight.

Look at the Lunar Module for a good example of a quickly evolving program.

The LM evolved continuously across just the 9 flight program. You could NEVER have done as many evolutionary changes which were done to get to J-missions if you had been using some sort of re-usable design. It was largely because the LM's were disposable, that the evolutionary changes could occur so quickly in the program.

I'm actually looking forward to watching the evolutionary progression of the CEV, CLV, CaLV, LSAM and EDS projects. What they start out with in the early years is quite likely to get continually improved throughout the life of the program.
 

Buoni argomenti "contro" lo shuttle.
« Risposta #1 il: Mar 21/02/2006, 16:47 »
Umh....alcune delle cose sostenute dal thread che stai seguendo sono innegabilmente giuste.
Permettimi, però, di dissentire sul fatto che la capsula Apollo avesse un cospicuo potenziale di crescita perché non è vero.

Non è tanto il fatto di scegliere la configurazione a capsula, piuttosto che alata (o a corpo portante) che incide sulle capacità del sistema di essere poi riadattato, di volta in volta, per differenti missioni.

Sono piuttosto le scelte progettuali e le tecnologie effettivamente disponibili al momento della progettazione che rendono un veicolo spaziale più o meno flessibile.

Ad esempio come mai la capsula Soyuz, nonostante il fatto che sia stata progettata oltre 40 anni fa, è tuttora in servizio (con un gran numero di versioni progettate e/o realizzata, sia civili che militari) mentre l'Apollo non lo è più???

A parte l'ovvia considerazione sul fatto che il progetto Apollo fosse strettamente (ed io aggiungo anche indissolubilmente) legato al programma lunare americano, non c'era nessuna ragione per cui Shuttle e Apollo ( o suoi derivati, magari lanciati da un Titan III o IV) potessero coesistere almeno per un pò, così come intendevano fare gli stessi russi con il Buran.

Le ragioni del successo della Soyuz sono le seguenti:
1) Design di tipo modulare con la possibilità di customizzare di volta in volta (eccezion fatta per il modulo di rientro) i vari moduli della capsula.
2) Configurazione di tipo "satellitare" ovvero non partecipe dell'aerodinamica del vettore al lancio (quindi la forma segue la funzione)
3) Concetto di "famiglia" quindi con un gran numero di versioni già previste sulla carta.

Queste considerazioni possono (a parte la seconda) più o meno valere anche per dei veicoli spaziali alati.

Per quel che riguarda l'Apollo il suo mancato utilizzo dopo le missioni lunari (a parte Skylab e ASTP che non hanno fatto altro che utilizzare il surplus) è da imputarsi non tanto e solo nella scelta della NASA di impegnarsi a fondo nel programma Shuttle, quanto nella sua scarsa flessibilità di base che non ha lasciato nessun altra scelta.

A questo punto va da se che il CEV-Constellation ripropone le stesse identiche limitazioni dell'Apollo, con la stessa mancanza di potenziale di sviluppo che ne limita le possibilità sin da ora.
 

Offline Buran

  • *
  • 510
    • http://deepspace.altervista.org/
Re: Buoni argomenti "contro" lo shuttle.
« Risposta #2 il: Mar 21/02/2006, 17:41 »
Citazione da: "carmelo pugliatti"
4-Lo shuttle è una macchina brucia soldi perchè dopo ogni missione  deve praticamente essere quasi ricostruito.L'orbiter è un veicolo complicatissimo; propio in ragione della sua riusabilità gran parte del bilancio va via per la manutenzione post volo ...



Concordo pienamente con l'intervento dell'Archipeppe.
In più aggiungerei che di per se la riusabilità non è un elemento di maggior costo per un vettore. Anzi! Lo Shuttle è un caso particolare che non può essere preso in considerazione perchè progettato seguendo criteri poco "ingegneristici" (vedi il mio post di qualche giorno fa...)
Invece sono due gli aspetti importanti che devono essere presi in considerazione per la definizione delle principali caratteristiche di un  lanciatore realmente low cost:
- la necessità di ridurre i costi di sviluppo e della infrastruttura di terra;
- la necessità di ridurre i costi totali ricorrenti (e.g. un piccolo ground crew, etc.)   

A causa di aspetti architetturali, a mio parere, questi due aspetti non potranno mai far scendere al di sotto di una certa soglia critica i costi delle capsule (riutilizzabili o no), che hanno a loro favore solo l'utilizzo di tecnologie che sono allo stato dell'arte ma comunque già pienamente disponibili sul mercato.
Al contrario i veivoli alati (in tutte le versioni possibili: SSTO, TSTO, Vertical TakeOff-Vertical Landing, Vertical TakeOff-Orizzontal Landing, etc.)  permettono in prospettiva un approccio più "aeronautico" al raggiungimento dello spazio orbitale.

Quindi piuttosto il dilemma è: o subito fatto piuttosto male o dopo fatto molto meglio ...
Buran

Personal:       http://deepspace.altervista.org/
Telespazio (sede Napoli, ex MARS Center) : www.telespazio.com
Mars Center: http://www.marscenter.it/
 

Buoni argomenti "contro" lo shuttle.
« Risposta #3 il: Mar 21/02/2006, 17:56 »
Buran ha posto in evidenza quello che, a mio parere, potrebbe essere un aspetto fondamentale dell'Astronautica futura (sperando che ce ne sia una....): l'utilizzo di metodologie e tecnologie aeronautiche in campo spaziale.

Nonostante tutto quello che è stato detto e scritto negli anni '70, lo Shuttle non è stato mai pensato per essere davvero impiegato come un "aereo commerciale", così come davvero dovrebbero essere i veicoli spaziali (alati o meno).

In realtà se l'Astronautica avesse seguito uno sviluppo "organico" a partire dall'Aeronautica si sarebbero dovuti avere aerei che volavano sempre più in alto e sempre più veloci fino ad arrivare in orbita (mi sembra di aver già espresso questo parere in qualche altro thread del Forum).

Gli americani si erano incamminati bene su questa strada perché avevano (fino ad un certo punto) scelto un approccio evolutivo al problema con la serie degli aerei X che ad evoluzione piramidale (in termini di prestazioni e di design) partivano dal supersonico (X 1) per arrivare all'orbitale (X 20).

Lo scoppio della "Corsa allo Spazio" (Space Race) ha però completamente stravolto questo discorso introducendo una nuova "classe" di veicoli spaziali, le capsule, che tipologicamente e tecnologicamente discendono dalle testate di rientro dei primi missili intercontinentali (ICBM).

Quindi da questo punto di vista le capsule possono essere intese come una "aberrazione" (se mi passate il termine), utili solo quando si ha poco tempo a disposizione e per obiettivi specifici (con delle eccezioni, Gemini, Soyuz e Shenzou).
Quindi il futuro dell'Astronautica passa attraverso l'Aeronautica, perché l'Aeronautica commerciale (o meglio i criteri che stanno alla base) si è rivelata vincente nel rendere accessibile a tutti il trasporto aereo anche su scala intercontinentale.

Naturalmente lo Spazio non sarà mai davvero accessibile a tutti, ma pensando i veicoli spaziali come se fossero aerei (e non necessariamente devono essere alati, vanno bene anche i corpi portanti) i costi si ridurrebbero aumentando l'utenza, il che potrebbe creare un circolo "virtuoso" autoalimentante.

Seppur su piccola scala credo che si debba cogliere la lezione fornita da Paul Allen & Burt Rutan con il loro SpaceShip One (e i suoi derivati attualmente in fase di sviluppo....)
 

Offline topopesto

  • *
  • 7.086
Buoni argomenti "contro" lo shuttle.
« Risposta #4 il: Mar 21/02/2006, 20:00 »
Concordo a pieno con il pensiero di Archipeppe.
Le capsule Apollo non erano possibili di sviluppo in alcun modo.
Se poi diciamo che hanno avuto dei piccoli miglioramenti, la stessa cosa si può dire, a gran voce, anche per lo Shuttle.
Stessa cosa dicesi per il CEV, per quanto mi riguarda.
Lo Shuttle avrebbe avuto migliori risultati se fossero stati corretti alcuni dei suoi più grandi difetti.
Primo fra tutti, lo scudo termico.
Se al posto del rivestimento attuale fosse stato utilizzato un altro tipo di materiale, che gli avesse garantito una maggior resistenza con un bassissimo controllo per la manutenzione, i tempi di volo avrebbero potuto esser ridotti e abbassare così i suoi costi di gestione.
Ci renderemo conto della necessità dello Shuttle, solo quando ci verrà a mancare, questo perchè essendo la ISS studiata per funzionare con lo SHuttle, il CEV non sarà in grado di soddisfare le necessità e i fabisogni della stazione.
Questo provocherà grandi problemi a tutto il progetto e quasi sicuramente, non riusciremo ad avere un equipaggio incrementato, sulla ISS, per il 2008.
Lo stesso errore lo stanno facendo con il CEV, nella configurazione attuale.
Io sono un super sostenitore del CEV SDLV e sono convinto che in questa versione avrebbero avuto sicuramente maggior possibilità di sviluppo e miglioramento a seconda del tipo di missione da svolgere.
 

Buoni argomenti "contro" lo shuttle.
« Risposta #5 il: Mar 21/02/2006, 20:46 »
Citazione da: "archipeppe"
Umh....alcune delle cose sostenute dal thread che stai seguendo sono innegabilmente giuste.
Permettimi, però, di dissentire sul fatto che la capsula Apollo avesse un cospicuo potenziale di crescita perché non è vero.

Non è tanto il fatto di scegliere la configurazione a capsula, piuttosto che alata (o a corpo portante) che incide sulle capacità del sistema di essere poi riadattato, di volta in volta, per differenti missioni.

Sono piuttosto le scelte progettuali e le tecnologie effettivamente disponibili al momento della progettazione che rendono un veicolo spaziale più o meno flessibile.

Ad esempio come mai la capsula Soyuz, nonostante il fatto che sia stata progettata oltre 40 anni fa, è tuttora in servizio (con un gran numero di versioni progettate e/o realizzata, sia civili che militari) mentre l'Apollo non lo è più???

A parte l'ovvia considerazione sul fatto che il progetto Apollo fosse strettamente (ed io aggiungo anche indissolubilmente) legato al programma lunare americano, non c'era nessuna ragione per cui Shuttle e Apollo ( o suoi derivati, magari lanciati da un Titan III o IV) potessero coesistere almeno per un pò, così come intendevano fare gli stessi russi con il Buran.

Per quel che riguarda l'Apollo il suo mancato utilizzo dopo le missioni lunari (a parte Skylab e ASTP che non hanno fatto altro che utilizzare il surplus) è da imputarsi non tanto e solo nella scelta della NASA di impegnarsi a fondo nel programma Shuttle, quanto nella sua scarsa flessibilità di base che non ha lasciato nessun altra scelta.

Su molte cose sono sostanzialmente  d'accordo ,tuttavia il fatto che l'Apollo "non era passibile di sviluppo in alcun modo",mi trova dissenziente.Il fatto che questa strada non sia stata seguita non vuol dire che non fosse promettente (vedi  http://www.forumastronautico.it/index.php?topic=800 ).L'Apollo avrebbe potuto essere lanciato con razzi parzialmente riutilizzabili,derivati dal Saturno 1B e dal Titan IIIC,ospitare fino a sei membri di equipaggio,essere accoppiato ad un retropack o ad un modulo di servizio-cargo in grado di portare una notevole quantità di payload alle stazioni.Moduli orbitali derivati dal LEM,e dotati di un braccio meccanico,potevano essere utilizzati per numerose configurazioni di missione.Il modulo di comando poteva essere,nella versione block-IV,persino riutilizzabile.Il fatto che non si sia voluto seguire questa strada, lasciandosi cullare da quelle che (purtroppo) alla fine si sono rivelate chimere,non vuol dire che non fosse percorribile (e del resto rimangono decine di studi a provarlo).Altra possibilità avrebbe potuto essere il "Big Gemini",come giustamente hai ricordato poco tempo fa.tra lìaltro sono sicuro che,se negli anni 70/80 si fosse seguita un architettura basata su l'evoluzione dell'Apollo,o sul Big Gemini,e su stazioni tipo Skylab,la logica evoluzione sarebbe stata una navetta spaziale,più piccola,interamente riutilizzabile,disponibile alla fine degli anni 90-primi 2000.Il grande errore,non tanto della NASA quanto dei politici del tempo, è stato voler abbandonare delle tecnologie già testate e promettenti per passare a qualcosa di totalmente nuovo.Dallo Shuttle si voleva troppo,alla fine si è avuto meno di quanto si sarebbe potuto ottenere seguendo la naturale e graduale evoluzione dei programmi precedenti.
 

Buoni argomenti "contro" lo shuttle.
« Risposta #6 il: Mar 21/02/2006, 21:00 »
evoluzione.
 

Offline topopesto

  • *
  • 7.086
Buoni argomenti "contro" lo shuttle.
« Risposta #7 il: Mar 21/02/2006, 21:48 »
E' giustissimo quello detto da Carmelo, però  bisogna ricordare che tutte le modifiche studiate, per migliorare le potenzialità della capsula Apollo o del LEm,  riducevano gli astronauti a rimanere immobili dentro le loro navicelle.
Vi immaginate 6 astronauti dentro la capsula Apollo?
Era tutto un arrangiarsi per sopperire a dei "problemi".
Sarebbe come voler trasformare un utilitaria in un pulman.
Si possono si infilare dentro più persone, ma come starebbero al suo interno?
A parer mio, i miglioramenti dovrebbero portare si ad aumentare le capacità, ma senza penalizzare gli astronauti e la sicurezza di un sistema di volo.
La stessa cosa stà succedendo per il CEV.
Per lo Shuttle, invece, utilizzando lo spacehab, avrebbero potuto aumentare il numero degli astronauti a bordo senza penalizzarli nello spazio o nei movimenti.
 

Buoni argomenti "contro" lo shuttle.
« Risposta #8 il: Mar 21/02/2006, 22:37 »
Vero,assolutamente vero.approfitto di questa osservazione per chiedervi un parere:secondo voi quale dovrebbe essere il numero ideale di componenti  per una missione dello Shuttle? secondo me,quattro.Comandante,pilota,e due specialisti di missione (tra l'altro fissando un numero di quattro si sarebbe potuto pensare a spostare tutti sul  ponte superiore,dotando ognuno di un seggiolino eiettabile).Chiedo  questo anche perchè ricordo di aver letto da qualche parte che con l'equipaggio standard di sette astronauti , i metri quadri a disposizione di ciascuno sono inferiori a quelli disponibili ai tre membri di una missione Apollo.Per quel che riguarda le eventuali Apollo fase-2 (chiamiamole così) avrebbero probabilmente avuto per lo più un equipaggio di quattro membri.La configurazione a sei posti era pensata come ferry  e come battello di salvataggio per le stazioni.erano  un pò come per la versione a dieci posti del CEV,una possibilità ingegneristica. Fermo restando le dimensioni limitate (ma anche sulla Soyuz non c'è da sguazzare,specie con tre Cosmonauti a bordo),non dobbiamo dimenticare la possibilità di aumentare lo spazio disponibile man mano che la tecnologia avrebbe permesso di ridurre i  grossi pannelli analogici,nè lo spazio aggiunto utilizzando moduli orbitali derivati dal LEM.Altra cosa da ricordare è che una simile architettura è comunque complementare a stazioni "Saturn-derived".
 

Buoni argomenti "contro" lo shuttle.
« Risposta #9 il: Mar 21/02/2006, 23:30 »
Discutere di questo interessante argomento mi richiama alla memoria una considerazione che avevo già espresso a suo tempo sul forum: giudicando dai crudi fatti,  non vi è stato, a mio parere,  un reale il vantaggio per il programma spaziale americano nell'avere sviluppato lo Shuttle così come lo conosciamo.

Sarebbe forse stato meglio seguire un percorso evolutivo delle capsule Apollo, simile a quello condotto tra le Mercury e le Gemini.

Perchè sembra che proprio ora la NASA si accorga dei notevoli punti di forza del design a capsula, mentre sembrava averle ignorate all'inizio degli anni '70, quando sposò il concetto di space shuttle? Non vi sembra strano? Io non credo che le cose siano da leggere in maniera troppo superficiale.

Per meglio comprendere, è bene fare un salto indietro nel tempo, e ricordare che il progetto originale Shuttle prevedeva sì l'orbiter, ma "gemellato" alla costruzione e manutenzione di una stazione spaziale. Quest'ultima, come sapete, fu poi stralciata dalla presidenza americana.
Così la nostra navetta prese il via sola, in ritardo, condizionata dai ulteriori tagli, da pretese dell'USAF che mai poi ne fece un effettivo uso.
Dopo un estenuante tira e molla, ecco rinascere negli anni 90 la stazione spaziale, internazionalizzata per renderla sostenibile economicamente. Si tratta però di una deformazione, si è invertita la prospettiva: è la ISS ad essere diventata la ragion d'essere dello Shuttle, e non vice versa.
C'e anche da considerare che gli americani non hanno mai saputo o voluto sviluppare dei sistemi autonomi di guida, cosa che invece ha permesso ai russo/sovietici di ottenere modulo auto assemblanti, come visto nel caso della Mir.

Ecco, tutto questo per dire che lo shuttle è una macchina meravigliosa, ma inutilmente complessa, perchè nata per sopperire a bisogni che poi non si sono verificati, e gambizzata dall'esplosione del Challenger nel 1986.
Certo, non era possibile buttare tutto alle ortiche, così per anni si è continuato a volare, con una sorta di inerzia scientifico/politica che si è scossa, purtroppo, solo con un altro incidente.

Ora penso sia davvero meglio partire con qualcosa di più semplice, con un programma a step, e dove non vi siano più componenti tanto complessi e costosi da renderne troppo costosa la modifica, l'evoluzione e... la cancellazione.

Personalmente quindi sostengo pienamente le considerazioni che sono alla base della scelta della configurazione a capsula per il CEV, peraltro molto ben espressi sull'ESAS report ancora reperibile, per chi ne fosse sprovvisto, sul sito www.nasawatch.com
Marco Zambianchi
ForumAstronautico Founder
Presidente Associazione ISAA
 

Offline Maxi

Buoni argomenti "contro" lo shuttle.
« Risposta #10 il: Mar 21/02/2006, 23:57 »
Concordo con tutti gli interventi ma questo non toglie che tornare, nel 2006, al concetto di capsula sia un clamoroso passo indietro per la NASA... Speriamo che almeno venga studiata qualche innovazione tecnologica (i motori a metano/ossigeno potevano essere interessanti) altrimenti ci troveremo con un concetto che è persino peggiore di quello delle Soyuz russe o della Shenzuo cinese!
Intanto attendo di sapere (questa estate) chi vincerà la gara di appalto per la costruzione...   :)
Collabora con : www.aliveuniverse.today
Socio del Gruppo Astrofili Viareggio- www.astrogav.eu
 

Buoni argomenti "contro" lo shuttle.
« Risposta #11 il: Mer 22/02/2006, 00:30 »
Citazione da: "Maxi"
Concordo con tutti gli interventi ma questo non toglie che tornare, nel 2006, al concetto di capsula sia un clamoroso passo indietro per la NASA...  
a questo proposito è interessantissima una considerazione fatta nel thread del forum Americano citato più sopra:" We've all become brainwashed by the last 40 years of spacecraft on Sci-Fi shows, but the safest tool for this job is the simplest one. With no over-complications, an Apollo-style capsule should be far safer than most other concepts". E' vero,siamo condizionati a pensare che una capsula sia un passo indietro rispetto ad un veicolo alato.Fatto stà che lo Shuttle ha tutti i guai che sappiamo,i suoi futuristici successori sono rimasti sulla carta,i resti del  buran sono  esposti in un capannone,dell'Hermes è rimasto un mock up semisfasciato.Dico tutto ciò con estrema tristezza e deusione.
 

Offline Maxi

Buoni argomenti "contro" lo shuttle.
« Risposta #12 il: Mer 22/02/2006, 00:42 »
Che sia la "cruda" realtà che vaporizza i nostri sogni?

Bella la foto dell'Hermes... quasi come il Buran nel parco...
Collabora con : www.aliveuniverse.today
Socio del Gruppo Astrofili Viareggio- www.astrogav.eu
 

Buoni argomenti "contro" lo shuttle.
« Risposta #13 il: Mer 22/02/2006, 00:47 »
Citazione da: "marcozambi"
Discutere di questo interessante argomento mi richiama alla memoria una considerazione che avevo già espresso a suo tempo sul forum: giudicando dai crudi fatti,  non vi è stato, a mio parere,  un reale il vantaggio per il programma spaziale americano nell'avere sviluppato lo Shuttle così come lo conosciamo.

Sarebbe forse stato meglio seguire un percorso evolutivo delle capsule Apollo, simile a quello condotto tra le Mercury e le Gemini.

Perchè sembra che proprio ora la NASA si accorga dei notevoli punti di forza del design a capsula, mentre sembrava averle ignorate all'inizio degli anni '70, quando sposò il concetto di space shuttle? Non vi sembra strano? Io non credo che le cose siano da leggere in maniera troppo superficiale.

Per meglio comprendere, è bene fare un salto indietro nel tempo, e ricordare che il progetto originale Shuttle prevedeva sì l'orbiter, ma "gemellato" alla costruzione e manutenzione di una stazione spaziale. Quest'ultima, come sapete, fu poi stralciata dalla presidenza americana.
Così la nostra navetta prese il via sola, in ritardo, condizionata dai ulteriori tagli, da pretese dell'USAF che mai poi ne fece un effettivo uso.
Dopo un estenuante tira e molla, ecco rinascere negli anni 90 la stazione spaziale, internazionalizzata per renderla sostenibile economicamente. Si tratta però di una deformazione, si è invertita la prospettiva: è la ISS ad essere diventata la ragion d'essere dello Shuttle, e non vice versa.
C'e anche da considerare che gli americani non hanno mai saputo o voluto sviluppare dei sistemi autonomi di guida, cosa che invece ha permesso ai russo/sovietici di ottenere modulo auto assemblanti, come visto nel caso della Mir.

Ecco, tutto questo per dire che lo shuttle è una macchina meravigliosa, ma inutilmente complessa, perchè nata per sopperire a bisogni che poi non si sono verificati, e gambizzata dall'esplosione del Challenger nel 1986.
Certo, non era possibile buttare tutto alle ortiche, così per anni si è continuato a volare, con una sorta di inerzia scientifico/politica che si è scossa, purtroppo, solo con un altro incidente.

Ora penso sia davvero meglio partire con qualcosa di più semplice, con un programma a step, e dove non vi siano più componenti tanto complessi e costosi da renderne troppo costosa la modifica, l'evoluzione e... la cancellazione.

Personalmente quindi sostengo pienamente le considerazioni che sono alla base della scelta della configurazione a capsula per il CEV, peraltro molto ben espressi sull'ESAS report ancora reperibile, per chi ne fosse sprovvisto, sul sito www.nasawatch.com
Questo è il punto! tra il programma  Shuttle,così come lo conosciamo,ed un programma basato su un percorso evolutivo delle capsule Gemini ed Apollo,meglio quest'ultimo.E' in questo senso che la frase di Griffin sul "mistake" dell'STS non può essere che condivisibile.L'Orbiter ,in versione più piccola ed interamente riutilizzabile,era il componente di un architettura che comprendeva Stazioni  "Saturn derived",orbitali ed in orbita lunare ,space tugs per l'orbita alta e la luna,astronavi per Marte.Di tutto questo è rimasto soltanto lo Shuttle,azzoppato nel suo concetto di riutilizzabilità,gonfiato nelle dimensioni ,trasformato in una sorta di impossibile lanciatore multiuso.Una sorta di inno al compromesso.Tra uno Shuttle così ed un evoluzione del programma AAP,mille volte meglio quest'ultimo;almeno la vecchia capsula Apollo è più versatile e meno"bloccata" (per non parlare della Gemini).
 

Buoni argomenti "contro" lo shuttle.
« Risposta #14 il: Mer 22/02/2006, 09:10 »
Dunque giusto per rispondere a Carmelo, quando scrivo che l'Apollo aveva scarso potenziale di sviluppo non intendevo dire che non fosse assolutamente modificabile ma che dal punto di vista configurativo non era possibile effettuare modifiche sostanziali per rendere il veicolo più "compliant" a nuovi scenari di missione.

Tutto questo per un motivo specifico: nel campo delle capsule spaziali abitate gli americani hanno (da sempre) prediletto un approccio di tipo "aerodinamico" ossia la capsula contribuisce attivamante all'aerodinamica del suo vettore (mentre i russi prediligono un approccio opposto di tipo "satellitare" ad eccezzione del TKS).

Questa filosofia costruttiva impone una configurazione di tipo conica o tronco-conica, con possibilità di variazione pari allo zero (altrimenti si altera sensibilmente l'aerodinamica dell'accoppiata vettore-capsula al lancio). Il che inesorabilmente porta la funzione a seguire la forma e non il contrario (che dovrebbe essere la situazione ottimale).

Naturalmente anche ad una capsula come l'Apollo è possibile modificare il modulo di servizio o aggiungere un retropacco (che guarda caso sono elementi ininfluenti dal punto di vista aerodinamico e  quindi facilmente modificabili).

Naturalmente anche i russi, nel caso della Soyuz, si guardano bene dal modificare la forma del modulo di rientro (a campana), ma nel loro caso possono modificare i 2/3 della Soyuz (moduli orbitale e di servizio) e ben il 60% della sezione pressurizzata.

Nel caso dell'Apollo era modificabile solo il modulo di servizio mentre il 100% della sezione pressurizzata era di fatto intoccabile.

Ovviamente il CEV, del quale (come ben sapete) sono MOLTO critico, mantiene inalterate tutte le caratteristiche (e a mio avviso pure i difetti) sopra elencati.

Per quanto riguarda l'equipaggio di un veicolo spaziale concordo con Carmelo nel dire che un team di 4/6 (massimo) astronauti sarebbe la combinazione ideale.
 

Offline Maxi

Buoni argomenti "contro" lo shuttle.
« Risposta #15 il: Gio 23/02/2006, 00:29 »
Citazione da: "archipeppe"
Per quanto riguarda l'equipaggio di un veicolo spaziale concordo con Carmelo nel dire che un team di 4/6 (massimo) astronauti sarebbe la combinazione ideale.


Vorrei dissentire un attimo da questa considerazione sul numero ideale di astronauti a bordo di un veicolo spaziale. Lo shuttle può ospitare fino ad un massimo di setto/otto astronauti e non vedo il motivo per cui non sfruttare questa opportunità. Ricordiamoci che parecchie missioni della navetta sono state effettuate con il modulo laboratorio Spacelab all'interno del vano di carico permettendo di trasformare questa astronave in una stazione spaziale per periodi fino a 16 giorni. Con la quantità di esperimenti da effettuare gli astronauti si separavano in due team per poter lavorare 24 ore su 24. Insomma lo so che era un ripiego perchè gli USA (e l'Europa) non avevano uno straccio di stazione spaziale ma in questo modo si è sopperito a questa mancanza. Concludo dicendo che ovviamente il numero ideale dipende dalle dimensioni e dal come è stata progettato il veicolo. La capsula CEV da sola serve soltanto per andare su e tornare giù... per tutto il resto ci sarà bisogno di moduli aggiuntivo come il LSAM ed altri da pensare...
Lo shuttle, al contrario, racchiudeva in se stesso sia il veicolo che la base orbitale... visto con il senno di poi una scelta sbagliata...
Collabora con : www.aliveuniverse.today
Socio del Gruppo Astrofili Viareggio- www.astrogav.eu
 

Buoni argomenti "contro" lo shuttle.
« Risposta #16 il: Gio 23/02/2006, 11:56 »
In realtà Maxi ha ragione.....ritengo che in qualche modo si debba mitigare il nostro giudizio sullo Shuttle: pur con tutti i suoi difetti e le sue pecche progettuali è senz'altro stato il primo veicolo spaziale riutilizzabile, senza considerare il fatto che (ad oggi) è stato anche quelle più grande e capiente (sia in termini di payload che di equipaggio) ad essere stato introdotto in servizio.
 

Buoni argomenti "contro" lo shuttle.
« Risposta #17 il: Gio 23/02/2006, 14:52 »
Chissà se gli shuttle del futuro avranno le stesse dimensioni dell'attuale orbiter o saranno più piccoli.
 

Buoni argomenti "contro" lo shuttle.
« Risposta #18 il: Gio 23/02/2006, 15:24 »
Personalmente ritengo che le dimensioni degli shuttle futuri, quali che siano, saranno decisamente più contenute rispetto all'attuale Orbiter.
Essenzialmente perché gran parte dello Shuttle è rappresentato dalla sua sovradimensionata Cargo Bay, universalmente riconosciuta (a posteriori) come uno degli elementi più fallimentari del progetto (nel corso della sua vita operativa lo Shuttle ha viaggiato spesso con la stiva vuota...).

Secondo me gli shutlle futuri non dovrebbero (almeno nella versione "manned") affatto avere alcuna cargo bay. Dovrebbero invece esistere versioni non pilotate specificamente concepite per il trasporto di payload, tenendo presente che quando il p/l (payload) supera un certo peso o dimensione non conviene l'uso di sistemi riutilizzabili per inviarlo in orbita.

Questo perché un sistema riutilizzabile necessita (per forza) di un sistema TPS (Thermal Protection System) che rappresenta un "peso morto" fino al momento del riento e subito dopo. Il discriminante per il dimensionamento di TPS non è la massa complessiva da proteggere quanto il volume, maggiore è il volume (anche non pressurizzato) maggiore è il peso di TPS necessario.

Paradossalmente un veicolo più pesante ma più piccolo richiede meno TPS (in ordine di peso) di un sistema più leggero ma più grosso  e voluminoso....
 

Offline Maxi

Buoni argomenti "contro" lo shuttle.
« Risposta #19 il: Ven 24/02/2006, 00:52 »
Concordo con Archipeppe per le misure più contenute di una prossima navetta (ma quando la vedremo mai... ora che la NASA si è innamorata del CEV?) anche perchè il vano di carico dello shuttle era veramente sovradimesionato. Ritengo invece che per un equipaggio siano validi i criteri dell'effettivo ruolo che devono svolgere durante la missione. In pratica potrebbero bastare due uomini come invece in alcuni casi ne potrebbero occorrere sei o più.
Collabora con : www.aliveuniverse.today
Socio del Gruppo Astrofili Viareggio- www.astrogav.eu