Mars Exploration Rover Update - June 7, 2007

http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/status.html#opportunity

OPPORTUNITY UPDATE: Checking Out New Driving Capabilities - sol 1194-1199, June 7, 2007:

Opportunity is healthy and continues to circumnavigate “Victoria Crater” back toward “Duck Bay.”

On sol 1194, Opportunity performed a Visual Target Tracking (VTT) technology checkout (drive software) on a target called “Paloma.” This VTT checkout tested VTT in combination with other drive software, Autonav and Visodom. The first segment was a blind (no Autonav or Visodom) VTT drive to back away from the target. The second segment combined VTT and Visodom to drive towards the target. The third segment combined VTT and Autonav to continue driving towards the target.

Sol-by-sol summary:

Sol 1194: Opportunity took a tau measurement then had a look at the sky and ground with its miniature thermal emission spectrometer. The rover then stowed its arm and conducted a test of its new drive software, VTT (visual target tracking). The VTT drive checkout was about 6.8 meters (22 feet). Post-VTT drive, the rover took navigation camera images of its tracks then drove about 30 meters (98 feet) and unstowed its arm. After that drive, the rover took navigation camera images and a post-drive panoramic camera image in the drive direction. Before the Mars Odyssey pass, the rover took another tau measurement. During Odyssey’s pass, the rover again used its miniature thermal emission spectrometer to look at the sky and ground

Sol 1195: On the morning of this sol, Opportunity took thumbnail images of the sky with its panoramic camera. The rover then did a tau measurement and followed that with an observation of the sky and ground by the miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 1196: Opportunity took a morning panoramic camera image of the horizon. The rover then took a tau measurement and used its miniature thermal emission spectrometer to observe the local sky. Opportunity then stowed its arm, drove and then unstowed its arm. After the drive, the rover took navigation and panoramic camera images. Before the Odyssey pass, the rover took a panoramic camera image. During the Odyssey pass, the miniature thermal emission spectrometer had a look at the sky and ground.

Sol 1197: In the morning of this sol, Opportunity monitored for dust. Some regular checks were completed on the much-used miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Opportunity took a tau measurement and then used the miniature thermal emission spectrometer to look at the sky. The panoramic camera then looked at the local foreground using all 13 of its filters. The miniature thermal emission spectrometer also had a look at the foreground and, again, at the sky. The panoramic camera did a sky survey at midday.

Sol 1198: On this sol, Opportunity took a tau measurement, then calibrated its miniature thermal emission spectrometer. The rover then stowed its arm, drove and took images with its hazard avoidance cameras. Opportunity then unstowed its arm and took post-drive navigation and panoramic camera images. During the Odyssey pass, Opportunity conducted a routine utility test on its miniature thermal emission spectrometer.

Sol 1199: Opportunity’s miniature thermal emission spectrometer took a sky and ground observation. The panoramic camera took a tau measurement. The miniature thermal emission spectrometer continued a day of hard work, completing a systematic ground stare and a 7-point sky and ground observation. The panoramic camera also conducted a systematic ground survey of the local area using its 13 filters.

Opportunity’s total odometry as of sol 1197 is 11,108 meters (6.90 miles).