MARS GLOBAL SURVEYOR IMAGES February 16-23, 2006

MARS GLOBAL SURVEYOR IMAGES
February 16-23, 2006

The following new images taken by the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) on
the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft are now available:

o A Matter of Time (Released 16 February 2006)
http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/2006/02/16

o Isidis Plains (Released 17 February 2006)
http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/2006/02/17

o Isidis Landforms (Released 18 February 2006)
http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/2006/02/18

o Devil-Streaked Plain (Released 19 February 2006)
http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/2006/02/19

o Meridiani Materials (Released 20 February 2006)
http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/2006/02/20

o Mars at Ls 12 Degrees (Released 21 February 2006)
http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/2006/02/21

o Smooth Transition (Released 22 February 2006)
http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/2006/02/22

o Kidney-Shaped Impact (Released 23 February 2006)
http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/2006/02/23

All of the Mars Global Surveyor images are archived here:

http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/index.html

Mars Global Surveyor was launched in November 1996 and has been
in Mars orbit since September 1997. It began its primary
mapping mission on March 8, 1999. Mars Global Surveyor is the
first mission in a long-term program of Mars exploration known as
the Mars Surveyor Program that is managed by JPL for NASA’s Office
of Space Science, Washington, DC. Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS)
and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC
using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates
the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion
Laboratory’s Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global
Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin
Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.