NASA'S CASSINI DISCOVERS POTENTIAL LIQUID WATER ON ENCELADUS

E scusate se è poco…
Grande missione!!!

March 9, 2006 Erica Hupp/Dwayne Brown Headquarters, Washington (202) 358-1237/1726

Carolina Martinez
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
(818) 354-9382

RELEASE: 06-088

NASA’S CASSINI DISCOVERS POTENTIAL LIQUID WATER ON ENCELADUS

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft may have found evidence of liquid water
reservoirs that erupt in Yellowstone-like geysers on Saturn’s moon
Enceladus. The rare occurrence of liquid water so near the surface
raises many new questions about the mysterious moon.

“We realize that this is a radical conclusion - that we may have
evidence for liquid water within a body so small and so cold,” said
Carolyn Porco, Cassini imaging team leader at the Space Science
Institute, Boulder, Colo. “However, if we are right, we have
significantly broadened the diversity of solar system environments
where we might possibly have conditions suitable for living
organisms.”

High-resolution Cassini images show icy jets and towering plumes
ejecting large quantities of particles at high speed. Scientists
examined several models to explain the process. They ruled out the
idea the particles are produced or blown off the moon’s surface by
vapor created when warm water ice converts to a gas. Instead,
scientists have found evidence for a much more exciting possibility.
The jets might be erupting from near-surface pockets of liquid water
above 0 degrees Celsius (32 degrees Fahrenheit), like cold versions
of the Old Faithful geyser in Yellowstone.

“We previously knew of at most three places where active volcanism
exists: Jupiter’s moon Io, Earth, and possibly Neptune’s moon Triton.
Cassini changed all that, making Enceladus the latest member of this
very exclusive club, and one of the most exciting places in the solar
system,” said John Spencer, Cassini scientist, Southwest Research
Institute, Boulder.

“Other moons in the solar system have liquid-water oceans covered by
kilometers of icy crust,” said Andrew Ingersoll, imaging team member
and atmospheric scientist at the California Institute of Technology,
Pasadena, Calif. “What’s different here is that pockets of liquid
water may be no more than tens of meters below the surface.”

“As Cassini approached Saturn, we discovered the Saturnian system is
filled with oxygen atoms. At the time we had no idea where the oxygen
was coming from,” said Candy Hansen, Cassini scientist at NASA’s Jet
Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena. “Now we know Enceladus is
spewing out water molecules, which break down into oxygen and
hydrogen.”

Scientists still have many questions. Why is Enceladus so active? Are
other sites on Enceladus active? Might this activity have been
continuous enough over the moon’s history for life to have had a
chance to take hold in the moon’s interior?

In the spring of 2008, scientists will get another chance to look at
Enceladus when Cassini flies within 350 kilometers (approximately 220
miles), but much work remains after the spacecraft’s four-year prime
mission is over.

“There’s no question, along with the moon Titan, Enceladus should be a
very high priority for us. Saturn has given us two exciting worlds to
explore,” said Jonathan Lunine, Cassini interdisciplinary scientist,
University of Arizona, Tucson, Ariz.

Mission scientists report these and other Enceladus findings in this
week’s issue of Science. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative
project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space
Agency.

JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, manages the
Cassini-Huygens mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate. The
Cassini orbiter was designed, developed and assembled at JPL.

For Cassini images and information about the research on the Web,
visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/cassini

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov

For information about NASA and agency programs on the Web, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/home

http://www.nasa.gov/home

-end-

Sicuramente la Cassini-Huygens si sta dimostrando una delle più interessanti missioni planetarie fin dai tempi delle Voyager.
Se non erro poi questa sarebbe la prima evidenza di acqua allo stato liquido (anche se grazie alla particolarità della situazione) in un altro luogo del sistema solare oltre al nostro pianeta.
WOW!!

E per tutti coloro che hanno litigato con l’inglese…! :smiley:

La sonda Cassini avrebbe individuato dei geyser su Enceladus, il più splendente corpo celeste del sistema solare

NEW YORK - La sonda Cassini ha trovato traccia d’acqua su una luna ghiacciata di Saturno. In particolare la sonda ha scoperto l’esistenza di acqua proveniente da geysers. Ciò fa balenare la possibilità che il corpo celeste possa ospitare qualche forma di vita. La sorprendente scoperta è ritenuta di grande interesse da molti scienziati, che sostengono che Enceladus, la luna in questione, dovrebbe essere aggiunta alla lista (peraltro corta) di pianeti nel sistema solare che hanno maggiori possinilità di essere albergo di vita extraterrestre.
«Abbiamo la “smoking gun” che prova l’esistenza d’acqua», ha detto Carolyn Porco, uno degli scienziati coinvolti nel progetto Cassini.
Se Enceladus ospita la vita essa probabilmente consiste di microbi o di organismi primitivi capaci di sopravvivere in condizioni ambientali estreme. David Morrison, uno degli scienziati più esperti del Nasa Astrobiology Institute, ha tuttavia invitato alla cautela prima di affrettarsi ad affermare che sulla luna di Saturno ci possa essere la vita. Gli scienziati, in generale concordano sul fatto che ci vogliono diversi ingredienti per rendere possibile la vita, tra cui l’acqua, una sorgente costante di calore e il giusto «mix» chimico. «Quello che è stato trovato è di sicuro interessante, ma io non ci vedo molto altro dietro» ha detto Morrison.
Gli astronomi credono che le lune ghiacciate di Marte e Giove potrebbero avere, o avere ospitato vita. Enceladus ha un diametro di 505 chilometri ed è il corpo più splendente dell’intero sistema solare. Si è sempre creduto che fosse fredda, ma ora gli esperti pensano che sia geologicamente attiva e con un sottosuolo caldo.

tratto dal corriere.it

Se poi volete potete sentire cosa ne pensa Giovanni Caprara ascoltando le sue parole http://mediacenter.corriere.it/MediaCenter/action/player?uuid=81987d88-afa4-11da-800a-0003ba99c667

Sono letteralmente in fermento!!! :scream: :stuck_out_tongue: 8)

Grandioso!
Altre info e foto quì:

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2006/09mar_enceladus.htm?list48557

L’immagine dell’evento fotografato dalla Cassini…

University Communications
University of Arizona
Tucson, Arizona

UA contacts on this research:

Alfred McEwen, 520-626-4573
Elizabeth Turtle, 520-621-8284
Jason Perry, 520-626-0760

March 09, 2006

Cassini Images of Enceladus Suggest Geysers Erupt Liquid Water at the
Moon’s South Pole

By Preston Dyches, CICLOPS/Space Science Institute, Boulder

Images returned from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft have yielded evidence that
the geologically young south polar region of Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus
may possess reservoirs of near-surface liquid water that erupt to form
geysers of the kind found in Yellowstone National Park.

This finding and others are being reported today by the Cassini Imaging
Science Team in the journal Science.

“We realize that this is a radical conclusion – that we may have evidence
for liquid water within a body so small and so cold,” said Dr. Carolyn
Porco, Cassini imaging team leader at the Space Science Institute in
Boulder, Colo., and the lead author of the Science report. “However, if we
are right, we have significantly broadened the diversity of solar system
environments where we might possibly have conditions suitable for living
organisms. It doesn’t get any more exciting than this.”

Dr. Alfred McEwen, Dr. Elizabeth Turtle and Jason Perry of The University
of Arizona’s Lunar and Planetary Laboratory are co-authors on the article.
McEwen is a member of the Cassini Imaging Science Team.

High resolution Cassini images showing the icy jets, and the towering
plume they create, reveal the abundance of the constituent particles and
the speed at which they are being ejected from Enceladus. These results
indicate that there are far too many particles being released from the
south pole of Enceladus for the source to be merely frozen mist condensing
out of a plume of water vapor, or particles that have been blown off
Enceladus by jets of water vapor arising from warm ice. Instead, they have
found a much more exciting possibility: the jets may be erupting from
near-surface pockets of liquid water above 0 degrees Celsius (32 degrees
Fahrenheit), like cold versions of the Old Faithful geyser in Yellowstone.

“There are other moons in the solar system that have liquid water oceans
covered by kilometers of icy crust,” said Dr. Andrew Ingersoll, an
atmospheric scientist and a co-author on the paper in Science. “What’s
different here is that pockets of liquid water may be no more than ten
meters below the surface.”

In the near-vacuum conditions at the moon’s surface, liquid water would
boil away into space, erupting forcefully into the void and carrying
particles of ice and liquid water along with the vapor. Analysis of the
jets and plumes indicate that most of the particles eventually fall back
to the surface, giving the moon’s south pole its extremely bright veneer.
Those that escape the moon’s gravity go into orbit around Saturn, forming
the E ring.

Cassini images have revealed the geology of Enceladus in startling detail,
including relaxed craters and extensive surface cracks and folds. Imaging
scientists report that the moon has undergone geologic activity over the
last four and half billion years up to the present, with the active south
pole being the only place where liquid water may currently exists near the
surface. Telltale geologic features throughout the southern hemisphere of
Enceladus also point to a change in the body’s shape with time. Scientists
believe these to be related to an episode of intense heating in the moon’s
past that may, in turn, explain the anomalous warmth and current activity
in the south polar region.

The sources of this warmth are a major puzzle. Some combination of tidal
flexing and heating of the interior by naturally radioactive material may
provide the heat to power the geysers, which almost certainly erupt from
the narrow, warm fractures, called ‘tiger stripes’, seen crossing
Enceladus’ south polar region. However, obtaining enough energy to
reproduce the observed heat emanating from the south pole is still a
problem.

Dr. Torrence Johnson, a satellite expert at NASA’s Jet Propulsion
Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., and a co-author, notes: “Active water
geysers on little Enceladus are a major surprise. We’re still puzzled
about the details and energy sources, but what’s exciting is that
Enceladus obviously figured out how to do it. Now it’s up to us to crack
the mystery.”

Images accompanying this release are available at
http://ciclops.org
http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov
and
http://www.nasa.gov/cassini

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European
Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory
(JPL), a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena,
manages the Cassini-Huygens mission for NASA’s Science Mission
Directorate, Washington. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras
were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging team consists
of scientists from the U.S., England, France, and Germany. The imaging
operations center and team leader (Dr. C. Porco) are based at the Space
Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

Related Web sites:

Dalla crosta gelata del pianeta escono violenti spruzzi, come veri
geyser. Finora nel sistema solare si era trovato soltanto ghiaccio
“C’è acqua su una luna di Saturno”
la scoperta della sonda Cassini
La Nasa: possibile la presenza di organismi viventi
di LUIGI BIGNAMI

ROMA - L’acqua allo stato liquido non è più una prerogativa della Terra. Giganteschi geyser infatti, sono stati osservati eruttare dalla superficie di Encelado, una delle innumerevoli lune che ruotano attorno a Saturno. La scoperta è stata realizzata grazie alle analisi eseguite sulle immagini scattate dalla sonda Cassini che ruota attorno al pianeta degli anelli.

“Anche se è difficile crederlo siamo certi che dalla crosta ghiacciata del pianeta escono violenti spruzzi d’acqua simili a quelli che si trovano nel Parco di Yellowstone (Stati Uniti)”, ha spiegato Carolyn Porco, responsabile dello studio delle immagini della Cassini, la quale ha sottolineato: “Se avremo la conferma della scoperta è indubbio che ci troviamo di fronte ad un ambiente dove è possibile la presenza di semplici organismi viventi”. Le fotografie mostrano getti di giganteschi volumi d’acqua che per la bassissima temperatura si trasforma immediatamente in ghiaccio.

L’acqua liquida sembra provenire da sotto la crosta composta da ghiaccio il quale, nel punto il cui l’acqua viene a giorno, è spesso solo una decina di metri. È probabile che l’acqua venga in superficie nel momento in cui agiscono contemporaneamente su Encelado le forze di gravità dei satelliti più vicini. Queste forze causano pressioni interne sulle rocce calde sufficienti a fondere il ghiaccio in acqua, la quale, trovandosi anch’essa sotto pressione, riesce a rompere la crosta superficiale e uscire allo scoperto.

Encelado è piccolo, cristallino, molto attivo e possiede una debolissima atmosfera. La sua superficie è costituita da aree coperte da crateri con diametri che arrivano anche a 35 km. Altre zone, invece, sono più lisce, quasi fossero state plasmate di recente. Altre aree ancora presentano fessure, corrugamenti e deformazioni crostali di vario tipo. Un insieme di elementi che fanno ipotizzare che la crosta del satellite non è più vecchia di 100 milioni di anni.

Durante l’ultimo sorvolo della Cassini, gli strumenti di bordo avevano messo in luce un misterioso fenomeno in prossimità del polo sud della luna. Qui infatti, la temperatura è superiore al resto della superficie del satellite, arrivando anche a - 160°C rispetto ai - 200° del resto della luna. “È come se l’Antartide fosse più caldo dell’equatore terrestre. C’è davvero qualcosa di anomalo sotto il Polo”, ha detto Porco.

E proprio in quell’area le ultime immagini scattate dalla Cassini mostrano il ghiaccio segnato da gigantesche “unghiate”. Tali “ferite”, secondo gli scienziati, sono molto giovani, non hanno cioè, più di 1.000 anni. Dai graffi, che in realtà sono fratture lunghe circa 130 km e larghe 40 e che corrono parallele le une alle altre, fuoriescono proprio i giganteschi geyser che emettono acqua, la quale poi, ghiacciandosi, va ad alimentare uno degli anelli più sottili di Saturno.

anche la Repubblica propone il suo interessante punti di vista!
http://www.repubblica.it/