STS-125 Hubble Servicing Mission

Cominciano a delinearsi le fasi della missione e i problemi per il soccorso, qui un interessante articolo sulla eventuale missione di soccorso:

NASA evaluates rescue for Hubble mission By John Copella, 7/31/2006 11:02:00 PM NASA evaluates rescue for Hubble mission

Details are starting to emerge about potential crew rescue options for the Hubble Servicing Mission (HSM), currently designated STS-125.

NASA Documents, which confirm STS-125 is the HST-SM04 mission, show the flight - currently scheduled to launch with Shuttle Discovery, NET (No Earlier Than) April 11, 2008 - has a rescue mission requirement under evaluation.

While a crew rescue option using a backup Shuttle has been a characteristic of both post-STS-107 flights so far, the HSM presents unique problems, outlined in a fascinating document.

For a worst-case scenario in which the HSM Orbiter is found to be fatally damaged after reaching orbit, NASA is starting to refine its planning regarding timelines, rendezvous and docking options, crew and suit transfer, required waivers and flight hardware modifications, and procedures for disposal - or unmanned re-entry attempt - of the damaged Orbiter.

Following the loss of Columbia on STS-107, NASA developed contingency plans and procedures that called for use of the International Space Station (ISS) as a safe haven. In the event that unrepairable damage to the Orbiter’s heat shield was detected on-orbit, NASA would direct the Orbiter to rendezvous and dock with the ISS, and transfer the crew aboard the Station until a rescue flight (called a Launch-On-Need, or LON, mission) could be launched to retrieve the crew and return them to earth.

However, for the HSM, because the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) orbits at a higher altitude and a different inclination than the ISS, a safe haven option at the Station is not possible.

For the HSM, the Orbiter simply does not carry enough fuel to effect the required orbital changes necessary to conduct an ISS rendezvous. As a result, NASA is looking at ways of keeping the crew of the stranded Orbiter alive, while a second rescue Orbiter is quickly prepped for flight, launched, and maneuvered to the disabled craft.

Complicating matters is the fact that pad 39-B is designated to be transferred to the CEV/CLV project for facility modifications in early 2007, leaving only a single pad (LC-39A) available to support both the HSM launch, and, if needed, a subsequent rescue mission approximately two weeks later.

According to NASA documents obtained by NASASpaceflight.com, NASA would launch a rescue mission only if unrepairable damage to the HSM orbiter’s heat shield is detected on-orbit. Because of the limited amount of reactants for the Orbiter’s fuel cells, which supply power, oxygen, and drinking water for the crew, NASA would need to decide by flight day 4 of the HSM whether or not to mount a rescue mission.

This would require NASA, as it has done on the two post-STS-107 flights, to give initial priority to inspection and evaluation of the Orbiter’s heat shield using the Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS).

While the damaged orbiter would have to revert to ‘lifeboat’ mode, shutting down as many systems as possible, the rescue Orbiter would be readied for launch. Without pad 39-B, NASA would have to bring in a record Launch-To-Launch turnaround, described as the ‘L-t-L’ ratio, knocking days off the re-availability of a pad following a launch by half.

Three options are currently being considered for docking the two Orbiters, and for transferring the crew from the crippled HSM vehicle to the rescue Orbiter. In the first, and apparently preferred, option, the Remote Manipulator System on the HSM Orbiter would grapple the Shuttle Crew Rescue (SCR) Orbiter. The SCR RMS would be used to transfer the crew, suited for EVA, from the HSM Orbiter to the SCR vehicle. This unique dual-RMS operation would eliminate the need for labor-intensive stationkeeping.

Two EVAs would occur on Flight Day 4. During the first EVA, the flight crew member responsible for RMS operation on the HSM flight would be transferred to the SCR. In addition, the SCR RMS would be used to transfer 4 Launch and Entry Suits (LES) from the HSM vehicle to the SCR, and two additional Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs) would be transferred from the SCR to the HSM.

The LES and EMU transfers are needed in order to provide enough suits for the crew from the crippled orbiter to make the EVA transfer from one vehicle to another, as well as to provide each crew member with the proper pressurized launch and entry suit for entry in the SCR vehicle. A second EVA would be used to transfer two additional LES from the HSM to the SCR, transfer an additional EMU from the SCR to the HSM, and transfer one EVA team and the pilot from the HSM to the SCR.

On flight day 5, the two vehicles would ungrapple, and the SCR RMS would again be used to transfer the two remaining LES from the HSM to the SCR, and to transfer two additional and unneeded EMUs from the SCR to the HSM, creating precious room for the HSM crew on the SCR middeck. A third and final EVA would be performed to transfer the remaining three crew members - the second EVA team and the HSM commander - from the HSM to the SCR.

At the completion of this complex ballet, the HSM Orbiter would be vacant of its crew and their LES, and would serve as storage for two additional EMUs that would be discarded along with, sadly, the crippled Orbiter itself. The SCR, in contrast, will be cramped - 11 crew members will be aboard, along with 4 bulky EMUs and 11 LES. Flight Day 6 would be used for stowage of loose items in the crew module and preparations for deorbit. Landing would occur on Flight Day 7.

In order to make this scheme work, NASA is considering a number of equipment modifications and waivers to its existing procedures and flight rules. With a maximum of four seats installed on the flight deck, the additional seven crew members from the HSM will have to be squeezed into seats on the middeck of the SCR.

One seat on the middeck would be installed in the upright position. The remaining six would be installed on their backs (recumbent). Three of those six recumbent seats would require new flight hardware for attaching to the aft middeck floor.

This configuration does not provide enough room for the Shuttle ergometer, and therefore NASA is looking at ways to provide the crew with the required exercise needed to offset the adverse physiological effects of several days in microgravity without the device.

Other configuration changes that are being considered by NASA include waiving the requirement for emergency bailout hardware, which would mean launching without the emergency egress pole and its associated equipment, and possible waivers for the 20g deceleration load limits on some flight hardware. NASA is also evaluating what, if any, modifications will need to be made to the Shuttle simulators at JSC in order to accommodate scenarios that involve two crews operating two Orbiters simultaneously.

A look at the overall timeline shows that NASA plans on the HSM being able to survive at least 17 days on-orbit, with additional contingency days possible if strict power and consumable conservation measures are adopted. Given this margin, which NASA believes amounts to about six days, the space agency believes it has enough time to carry out an exhaustive inspection of the HSM Orbiter’s thermal protection system (TPS), and still leave enough time to roll-out and launch a rescue mission.

NASA believes safe separation and disposal of the damaged orbiter is feasible based on engineering it performed to develop the ISS safe haven procedures. Prior to crew egress, the HSM vehicle would be placed in a mode where its attitude would be constant and stable, the HSM Orbiter’s Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) engines would be armed, and the SCR would ungrapple from the HSM.

After final crew egress and relocation to the SCR, Houston would then send commands to the HSM Orbiter to fire its OMS engines, triggering entry and destruction of the orbiter due to what is presumed to be fatal TPS damage. However, the Orbiter may also be saved via the Autonomous Orbiter Rapid Prototype (AORP), or Remote Controlled Orbiter IFM cable, for a controlled re-entry in an attempt to save the vehicle.

STS-125 isn’t expected to make the working manifest until the end of the year, and a supporting LON mission is very unlikely to be mentioned at that time, given the route NASA wishes to take in the lead up to this mission.

On-going improvements to on orbit repair techniques is what NASA wishes to be the rationale for removing the supporting LON flights from the manifest - and from dismissing its need for one to associated with STS-125. However, should the agency suffer a setback, and still require to service Hubble, a one-of-its-kind rescue mission may be required.

If that becomes the case, NASA will have a plan.

http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/content/?cid=4683

Sicuramente alla NASA “sperano” di non dover mai tentare una si fatta missione di recupero! Infatti lancio di una seconda navetta entra 2 settimane e pure dallo stesso pad (visto che al 39/b all’epoca saranno già al lavoro per riconvertirlo per lanciare gli ARES), avvicinamento e ben tre EVA per trasferire l’equipaggio da un orbiter all’altro e poi il pienone (11 astronauti!!) stivati in un unico shuttle per il rientro… :scream:
Speriamo caldamente che le tecniche di riparazione testate durante STS-114 e STS-121 possano essere abbastanza sicure per eseguirle in caso di bisogno durante STS-125. Confido anche che le modifiche effettuate agli ET siano arrivate ad un buon punto (le riprese durante il lancio di STS-121 hanno mostrato poco e piccolo distacco di foam.

Non vorrei dire una cavolata,ma nelle nuove regole di sicurezza,quando c’è uno Shuttle in missione,nn ve nedovrebbe essere un altro in fase avanzata di preparazione appunto per approntare una missione di salvataggio? Vi dico già che probabilmente mi ricordo male :flushed:

Non vorrei dire una cavolata,ma nelle nuove regole di sicurezza,quando c'è uno Shuttle in missione,nn ve nedovrebbe essere un altro in fase avanzata di preparazione appunto per approntare una missione di salvataggio? Vi dico già che probabilmente mi ricordo male :flushed:

Ricordi bene, ma la grossa differenza sta nei tempi. Durante una missione ISS, infatti, l’equipaggio troverebbe rifugio nella stazione, fino all’arrivo del nuovo Shuttle, che potrebbe essere lanciato in tempi, diciamo così, più “rilassati”.
Nel caso di una missione Hubble tutto dovrebbe essere organizzato in modo da non far superare alla navetta danneggiata i 18/19 giorni di permanenza in orbita, che pare il limite massimo per uno Shuttle con equipaggio completo.

Ok,perfetto!

Ho inserito lo stesso post in due thread perchè non so quale sia quello “ufficiale” che poi si svilupperà con la missione… :flushed:
Si potrebbe anche unirli e rinominarlo “STS-125 MISSION LOG”, a decisione del capitano :smiley: ( e di Sivodave che aveva aperto l’altro :wink: )

La decisione e l’annuncio della data di missione saranno rese pubbliche durante una conferenza martedì prossimo.
Secondo le prime indiscrezioni pubblicate da nasaspaceflight.com la missione potrebbe essere anticipata al 2007, comandante della missione sarà Scott Altman che comandò già la precedente servicing mission nel 2002, il pilota sarà Ken Ham e l’equipaggio sarà composto da altri veterani di Hubble, John Grunsfeld e Mike Massimino, e probabilmente anche Megan McArthur che negli ultimi anni ha lavorato a questo progetto.
La possibilità della conferma al lancio sono legate alla necessità di avere a disposizione (LON) una navetta che possa portare eventuali soccorsi alla STS-125.

Questo è il comunicato NASA:

MEDIA ADVISORY: M06-170

NASA Sets Hubble Servicing Mission Decision Announcement

NASA Administrator Michael Griffin will announce on Tuesday, Oct. 31, a decision on a space shuttle mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope. The announcement is scheduled for 10 a.m. EST during an agency-wide employee meeting from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The event will be live on NASA TV and www.nasa.gov.

A news conference will follow at Goddard; also broadcast live on NASA TV at 12:45 p.m. Questions from reporters will be taken from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Fla., Johnson Space Center, Houston, and NASA Headquarters. Media who want to attend the news briefings must contact Goddard public affairs to arrange accreditation and access to the center. Reporters should call either Ed Campion or Susan Hendrix at 301-286-8955.

Next week’s decision follows a final evaluation meeting at NASA Headquarters Friday, where senior agency officials presented their recommendations to Griffin on the feasibility of a servicing mission.

If the decision is made to go ahead with a servicing mission, NASA will hold several other media events on Tuesday, Oct. 31 (all times Eastern):

2:30 p.m. News conference with the astronauts who would carry out the mission from Johnson; broadcast live on NASA TV. Questions from reporters will be taken from Goddard, Kennedy and NASA Headquarters.

3:30 to 5 p.m. Media interview opportunities on NASA TV. Hubble Space Telescope experts will be available for satellite interviews. The specific experts are TBD.

5 to 7 p.m. Astronaut media interview opportunities on NASA TV. Certain servicing crew members will be available for satellite interviews. The specific astronauts are TBD.

Media interested in the astronaut satellite interviews must contact the Johnson Newsroom at 281-483-5111 by 6 p.m. EST Oct. 30. The astronaut satellite interviews will be carried live on the NASA TV analog satellite AMC-6, at 72 degrees west longitude; transponder 5C, 3800 MHz, vertical polarization, with audio at 6.8 MHz.

To schedule a satellite interview with a Hubble Space Telescope expert, media must contact Ed Campion at Goddard at 301-286-8955 by 5 p.m. EST Oct. 30.

E questi sono gli articoli sull’annuncio:

http://www.spaceflightnow.com/news/n0610/27hubble/
http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/content/?cid=4881

Non vorrei dire una cavolata,ma nelle nuove regole di sicurezza,quando c'è uno Shuttle in missione,nn ve nedovrebbe essere un altro in fase avanzata di preparazione appunto per approntare una missione di salvataggio? Vi dico già che probabilmente mi ricordo male :flushed:

Ricordi bene, ma la grossa differenza sta nei tempi. Durante una missione ISS, infatti, l’equipaggio troverebbe rifugio nella stazione, fino all’arrivo del nuovo Shuttle, che potrebbe essere lanciato in tempi, diciamo così, più “rilassati”.
Nel caso di una missione Hubble tutto dovrebbe essere organizzato in modo da non far superare alla navetta danneggiata i 18/19 giorni di permanenza in orbita, che pare il limite massimo per uno Shuttle con equipaggio completo.

Una domanda…Perche lo shuttle non riesce a stare piu di 18/19 giorni in Orbita?
E solo per la questione di aria ecc ecc o c’e del altro?

E’ di oggi la notizia della sostituzione del Discovery con l’Atlantis, la decisione è arrivata dopo lo slottamento delle ultime 2 missioni del 2007. E’ quindi avvenuto lo scambio di mezzi con la STS-126 che utilizzerà il Discovery.
La missione sarà composta da 4 EVA e 11 giorni in orbita, nella stiva lo Shuttle avrà quasi 10 tonnellate di equipaggiamenti.
Come noto le misure di sicurezza saranno rigorose, e se c’è da scongiurare qualsiasi problema, grazie a queste regole potremo assistere ad uno spettacolo visto fino ad ora solo nei film, sarà infatti la prima voltà che due shuttle saranno contemporaneamente sulle due rampe del ksc, uno spettacolo senza precedenti necessario per avere già pronta la missione di soccorso al momento del lancio della STS-125.
Sarà anche l’ultima missione che partirà dalla 39B prima della definitiva riconversione.

http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/content/?cid=4987

Urcala!
Non vedo l’ora di poter seguire questa splendida missione!
Questo risvolto ci regalerà davvero delle immagini pazzesche!
Spero di poterle condividere con tutti voi!

...sarà infatti la prima voltà che due shuttle saranno contemporaneamente sulle due rampe del ksc, uno spettacolo senza precedenti necessario per avere già pronta la missione di soccorso al momento del lancio della STS-125.....

Ora non ho sottomano le date e le missioni, ma è già successo che due Shuttles si trovassero in rampa contemporaneamente, soprattutto a causa di ritardi al lancio e riprogrammazione forzata di missioni.
Certo questa volta avrà tutto un altro sapore: una navetta in missione e una sorella pronta ad un volo in suo soccorso.
Godiamoci questi ultimi anni di Shuttle, saranno spettacolari certamente !

...sarà infatti la prima voltà che due shuttle saranno contemporaneamente sulle due rampe del ksc, uno spettacolo senza precedenti necessario per avere già pronta la missione di soccorso al momento del lancio della STS-125.....

Ora non ho sottomano le date e le missioni, ma è già successo che due Shuttles si trovassero in rampa contemporaneamente, soprattutto a causa di ritardi al lancio e riprogrammazione forzata di missioni.
Certo questa volta avrà tutto un altro sapore: una navetta in missione e una sorella pronta ad un volo in suo soccorso.
Godiamoci questi ultimi anni di Shuttle, saranno spettacolari certamente !

Uhmm sei sicuro? Non mi sembra, però cercherò se è mai successo.

Non mi ricordo le missioni, ma se non ricordo male era il 1985-86.

Non mi ricordo le missioni, ma se non ricordo male era il 1985-86.

Battuto sul tempo !
Stavo postando le stesse foto !

Whoops… :flushed: bastava rileggere l’articolo: “While that wouldn’t be the first time two orbiters were out of adjacent pads, ironically it will be…”

Chiamatemi superman !

Questa forse è un’altra occasione:

Le foto , postate da me precedentemente, si riferiscono al 5 settembre 1990.
In primo piano Columbia attende il via x la missione STS-35, sullo sfondo Discovery, in attesa x la misione Ulisses.
Un articolo, in merito, era stato pubblicato su:
AERONAUTICA & DIFESA del novembre 1990.

Sul Forum di NasaSpaceFlight ho trovato un elenco a dir poco impressionante !

STS-61-C (Columbia) and STS-51-L (Challenger) Dec. 22, 1985 (rollout of 51-L to Pad B)
to Jan. 12, 1986 (launch of 61-C from Pad B)

STS-31 (Discovery) and STS-35 (Columbia) April 22, 1990 (rollout of STS-35 to Pad A)
to April 24, 1990 (launch of STS-31 from Pad B)

STS-38 (Atlantis) and STS-35 (Columbia) Oct. 14, 1990 (rollout of STS-39 to Pad B)
to Nov. 15, 1990 (launch of STS-38 from Pad A)

STS-37 (Atlantis) and STS-39 (Discovery) April 1, 1991 (rollout of STS-39 to Pad A)
to April 5, 1991 (launch of STS-37 from Pad B)

STS-45 (Atlantis) and STS-49 (Endeavour) March 12, 1992 (rollout of STS-49 to Pad B)
to March 24, 1992 (launch of STS-45 from Pad A)

STS-50 (Columbia) and STS-46 (Atlantis) June 11, 1992 (rollout of STS-46 to Pad B)
to June 25, 1992 (launch of STS-50 from Pad A)

STS-56 (Discovery) and STS-55 (Columbia) Feb. 7, 1993 (rollout of STS-55 to Pad A)
to April 8, 1993 (launch of STS-56 from Pad B)

STS-64 (Discovery) and STS-68 (Endeavour) Aug. 19, 1994 (rollout of STS-64 to Pad B)
to Aug. 24, 1994 (rollback to VAB of STS-68 from Pad A)

STS-71 (Atlantis) and STS-70 (Discovery) May 11, 1995 (rollout of STS-70 to Pad B)
to June 8, 1995 (rollback to VAB of STS-70 from Pad B)

STS-71 (Atlantis) and STS-70 (Discovery) June 15, 1995 (rollout of STS-70 to Pad B)
to June 27, 1995 (launch of STS-71 from Pad A)

STS-70 (Discovery) and STS-69 (Endeavour) July 6, 1995 (rollout of STS-69 to Pad A)
to July 13, 1995 (launch of STS-70 from Pad B)

STS-69 (Endeavour) and STS-73 (Columbia) Aug. 28, 1995 (rollout of STS-73 to Pad B)
to Sept. 7, 1995 (launch of STS-69 to Pad A)

STS-73 (Columbia) and STS-74 (Atlantis) Oct. 12, 1995 (rollout of STS-74 to Pad A)
to Oct. 20, 1995 (launch of STS-73 from Pad B)

STS-95 (Discovery) and STS-88 (Endeavour) Oct. 21, 1998 (rollout of STS-88 to Pad A)
to Oct. 29, 1998 (launch of STS-95 from Pad B)

STS-103 (Discovery) and STS-99 (Endeavour) Dec. 13, 1999 (rollout of STS-99 to Pad A)
to Dec. 19, 1999 (launch of STS-103 from Pad B)

STS-104 (Atlantis) and STS-105 (Discovery) July 2, 2001 (rollout of STS-105 to Pad A)
to July 12, 2001 (launch of STS-104 from Pad B)

Non vedo l'ora di poter seguire questa splendida missione! Questo risvolto ci regalerà davvero delle immagini pazzesche
Questa è roba da spacecraft films,di sicuro! :wink:

E questo (speriamo) è lo spettacolo che ci aspetta: